The Heart of Awareness

A Translation of the Ashtavakra Gita

The Heart of Awareness

Wolf Haas' Detective Brenner series has become wildly popular around the world for a reason: They're timely, edgy stories told in a wry, quirky voice that's often hilarious, and with a protagonist it's hard not to love. In this episode, Brenner-forced out of the police force-tries to get away from detective work by taking a job as the personal chauffeur for two-year-old Helena, the daughter of a Munich construction giant and a Viennese abortion doctor. One day, while Brenner's attention is turned to picking out a chocolate bar for Helena at a gas station, Helena gets snatched from the car. Abruptly out of a job, Brenner decides to investigate her disappearance on his own. With both parents in the public eye, there's no scarcity of leads-the father's latest development project has spurred public protest, and the mother's clinic has been targeted by the zealous leader of an anti-abortion group. Brenner and God is told with a dark humor that leaves no character, including Brenner, unscathed. Haas tells the story of a fallible hero who can be indecisive and world-weary, baffled and disillusioned by what he finds, but who presses forward nonetheless out of a stubborn sense of decency-a two-year-old is kidnapped, so you find her, because that's just what you do.

Ashtavakra Gita - The Heart of Awareness

A Bilingual Edition in Sanskrit and English

Ashtavakra Gita - The Heart of Awareness

The Ashtavakra Gita, or the Ashtavakra Samhita as it is sometimes called, is a very ancient Sanskrit text. Nothing seems to be known about the author, though tradition ascribes it to the sage Ashtavakra; hence the name. There is little doubt though that it is very old, probably dating back to the days of the classic Vedanta period. The Sanskrit style and the doctrine expressed would seem to warrant this assessment. The work was known, appreciated and quoted by Ramakrishna and his disciple Vivekananda, as well as by Ramana Maharshi, while Radha­krishnan always refers to it with great respect. Apart from that the work speaks for itself. It presents the traditional teachings of Advaita Vedanta with a clarity and power very rarely matched. The Reverend John Henry Richards, MA, BD, was an Anglican priest born in 1934 who was ordained a deacon in Llandaff in 1977 and a priest there in 1978. He served in Maesteg, Cardiff, Penmark, and Stackpile Elidor until his retirement in 1999, and died in 2017. He is known for his English translations of the Ashtavakra Gita, the Dhammapada, and the Vivekachudamani, which he put in the public domain and distributed on the Internet in 1994. The text used here is the one revised in 1996.

Ending the Search

From Spiritual Ambition to the Heart of Awareness

Ending the Search

What is life when seeking ends? Just what is, nothing more or less— an ordinary person doing ordinary things, not wishing to be more or less, content to simply be herSelf. —Dorothy Hunt, Only This Do you ever feel as if your spiritual search is getting you nowhere? That despite sincere intention and effort, you’re reaping frustration instead of fruit? In Ending the Search, Dorothy Hunt unravels a dilemma that has vexed countless people on a spiritual path. “You may have tried all manner of practices, meditation, guru shopping, chanting, prayer, and still you have not attained your heart’s desire,” she writes. “This book is about the ego’s spiritual ambition, its search for its idea of ‘enlightenment,’ its struggles and its eventual fate as seeker becomes the sought.” Ending the Search explores the deep spiritual impulse to awaken and the ways a future-focused mind “co-opts” or veils what is timelessly free, loving, and ever present. Dorothy invites us to follow our longing for truth, love, or enlightenment back to their source—the Heart that is beckoning us beyond separation. While describing and honoring different practices and paths taken in one’s search for Truth, she emphasizes the practice of self-inquiry as taught by Ramana Maharshi. We are invited to search not for an idea of something “out there,” but for the true identity of the seeker, the unnamable Mystery that is compassionately aware, existing right now in each of us. The book also looks at the processes of embodiment and surrender, the need for “ruthless honesty” without self-judgment, and in its concluding section, shares a vision of life lived authentically. “The spiritual search is a call to remember who or what you essentially are,” explains Dorothy Hunt. “What ends the search is actually present from the very beginning, beckoning you to come Home. In truth, you are what you seek, yet you must make the discovery for yourself.” This is your invitation, with Ending the Search. Highlights: • The nature of spiritual ambition • When practice becomes problematic • How the thinking mind separates us from the moment • Silence and stillness, our greatest teachers • Ego and the trance of separation • The human heart as a doorway to the infinite • The freedom of Presence • The price of Realization • Gurus, spiritual teachers, and charlatans • Undoing core egoic beliefs • Resting the mind in the Heart of Awareness

The Heart of Meditation

Discovering Innermost Awareness

The Heart of Meditation

The heart of meditation—the thing that brings it alive—is compassion. Without that essential foundation, other practices are pointless. Fortunately, the mind can be trained in compassion, and the mind thus trained with the qualities of love, empathy, kindness, and respect for others is ready for the practice of the Great Completeness (Dzogchen), which is considered the pinnacle of spiritual practice in the Nyingma tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. His Holiness the Dalai Lama here teaches the Great Completeness simply but thoroughly, using as his reference a visionary poem by the nineteenth-century master Patrul Rinpoche to show that insight can never be separated from compassion. Through practice of the Great Completeness, we can access our innermost awareness and live our lives in a way that acknowledges it and manifests it. The wisdom and compassion that arise from such insight are critical, His Holiness teaches, not only to individual progress in meditation but to our collective progress toward peace in the world.

Journey to the Heart of God

Mystical Keys to Immortal Mastery

Journey to the Heart of God

The powerful relevations contained in this book emerged from a period during which the author experienced a transfiguration, entering the presence of the Infinite for the second time since moving into God-consciousness in 2000.

The Heart of Awareness for Work/Life Balance

The Heart of Awareness for Work/Life Balance

The Heart of Awareness for Work/Life Balance is a book about knowing how to get to the depths of who you are. To find true balance in your life mentally, physically, and socially. You uncover who you are at the depths of it all. When you are revealed, the rest of you is now able to make choices for a better tomorrow. Isn’t that what we are all looking for in life? Balance between home and work, and to feel good. So many of us are drained by the monotony at work, that by the time we get home, we are exhausted. Finding balance, middle ground, learning to make choices that feel good is the beginning of the end. Inside you will learn the true keys to unlocking health, abundance, and well-being that will last an eternity.

The Heart of ACT

Developing a Flexible, Process-Based, and Client-Centered Practice Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

The Heart of ACT

In The Heart of ACT, renowned acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) trainer Robyn Walser explores ACT as a process-based therapy incorporating interpersonal, intrapersonal, and overarching and ongoing processes, as well as the integration of six core components of psychological flexibility to connect clinicians to the dynamic and relational implementation of ACT. Engaging clinical scenarios, therapeutic insights, and supervision dialogues are offered to help clinicians move beyond their conceptual understanding of ACT principles to master the nuances of the therapeutic relationship at the heart of ACT. Using the tips and strategies in this professional guide, you’ll develop a flexible, grounded, and client-centered practice. With this comprehensive resource, you’ll learn to cultivate an organic, process-driven practice, grounded in the heart of the therapeutic relationship and responsive to clients in the moment. The Heart of ACT is designed to mimic the supervision experience by presenting material in thought-provoking chapters grounded in real-life clinical situations and challenges. In the book, you’ll also find supervision dialogues inspired by Walser's work with her supervisees, Carlton Coulter and Manuela O’Connell. Carlton and Manuela comment and ask questions related to the material in the book and their own ACT learning process. These are then addressed by Walser in a dialogue designed to assist clinicians in connecting to the material. These sections mimic the helpful mentoring process of one-on-one training and supervision, and offer insights into specific therapeutic challenges that can unfold in structured conversation. As the applications of ACT grow, so does the need for up-to-date professional resources. Unlike many advanced ACT books that focus on procedures and techniques, The Heart of ACT focuses on the heart of the therapeutic relationship, as well as the “soft skills” that are difficult to describe, but which often mark the difference between a merely good clinician and an excellent one. If you’re looking to take your ACT delivery to a new, exciting level, this book is a must-have addition to your professional library.

Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)

Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)

A New York Times Bestseller. A scientist’s exploration into the mysteries of the human mind. What is the mind? What is the experience of the self truly made of? How does the mind differ from the brain? Though the mind’s contents—its emotions, thoughts, and memories—are often described, the essence of mind is rarely, if ever, defined. In this book, noted neuropsychiatrist and New York Times best-selling author Daniel J. Siegel, MD, uses his characteristic sensitivity and interdisciplinary background to offer a definition of the mind that illuminates the how, what, when, where, and even why of who we are, of what the mind is, and what the mind’s self has the potential to become. MIND takes the reader on a deep personal and scientific journey into consciousness, subjective experience, and information processing, uncovering the mind’s self-organizational properties that emerge from both the body and the relationships we have with one another, and with the world around us. While making a wide range of sciences accessible and exciting—from neurobiology to quantum physics, anthropology to psychology—this book offers an experience that addresses some of our most pressing personal and global questions about identity, connection, and the cultivation of well-being in our lives.

The Heart of Islamic Philosophy

The Quest for Self-knowledge in the Teachings of Afḍal Al-Dīn Kāshānī

The Heart of Islamic Philosophy

An important medieval Islamic philosopher who is little known outside the Persian world, Afdal al-Din Kashani held the position that philosophy awakens people from forgetfulness and incites them to reach for the perfection of existence.

The Heart of Religion

The Heart of Religion