Making People Illegal

What Globalization Means for Migration and Law

Making People Illegal

Making People Illegal evaluates why migration law in the twenty-first century is markedly different from even the recent past, and argues that this is a harbinger of paradigm shift in the rule of law."--BOOK JACKET.

Making Migration Law

The Foreigner, Sovereignty, and the Case of Australia

Making Migration Law

This thought-provoking study examines the backstory and enduring contemporary effects of Australia's claim to an absolute right to exclude foreigners.

British Year Book of International Law 2008

British Year Book of International Law 2008

Now in its 79th year, the British Year Book of International Law has become an essential work of reference for academics and practising lawyers. Through a mixture of articles and extended book reviews it continues to provide up-to-date analysis on important developments in modern international law. In addition, through its exhaustive coverage of decisions in UK courts and official government statements, the British Year Book offers unique insight into the development of state practice in the United Kingdom.

Policing Undocumented Migrants

Law, Violence and Responsibility

Policing Undocumented Migrants

Migration policing experiments such as boat turn-backs and offshore refugee processing have been criticised as unlawful and have been characterised as exceptional. Policing Undocumented Migrants explores the extraordinarily routine, powerful, and above all lawful practices engaged in policing status within state territory. This book reveals how the everyday violence of migration law is activated by making people ‘illegal’. It explains how undocumented migrants are marginalised through the broad discretion underpinning existing frameworks of legal responsibility for migration policing. Drawing on interviews with people with lived experience of undocumented status within Australia, perspectives from advocates, detailed analysis of legislation, case law and policy, this book provides an in-depth account of the experiences and legal regulation of undocumented migrants within Australia. Case studies of street policing, immigration raids, transitions in legal status such as release from immigration detention, and character based visa determination challenge conventional binaries in migration analysis between the citizen and non-citizen and between lawful and unlawful status. By showing the organised and central role of discretionary legal authority in policing status, this book proposes a new perspective through which responsibility for migration legal practices can be better understood and evaluated. Policing Undocumented Migrants will be of interest to scholars and practitioners working in the areas of criminology, criminal law, immigration law and border studies.

Citizens' Rights and the Right to Be a Citizen

Citizens' Rights and the Right to Be a Citizen

Citizens’ rights are the essential connecting link between human rights and life in a democratic society. The right to be a citizen can bridge the gap between the universality of human rights and the changing political and social settings of people’s lives.

Research Handbook on International Law and Migration

Research Handbook on International Law and Migration

Migration is a complex and multifaceted issue, and the current legal framework suffers from considerable ambiguity and lack of cohesive focus. This Handbook offers a comprehensive take on the intersection of law and migration studies and provides strat

Women, Borders, and Violence

Current Issues in Asylum, Forced Migration, and Trafficking

Women, Borders, and Violence

Women at the Border analyzes border policing practices currently informed by paradigms of securitization against unauthorized mobility and explores the potential for a paradigm shift to a more ethical regulation of borders. By focusing on the ways women have sought to cross borders in ‘extra’-legal fashion, the book shows how border enforcement differentially impacts on some populations and makes the case that unauthorized migration requires management rather than repulsion and criminalization. When facing the emerging and future challenges of unauthorized mobility, border policing must be recast as a function of human rights that results in greater human security at the border. Examining gender and border policing across Europe, North America and Australia, this book enhances our understanding of the gendered determinants of ‘extra’-legal border crossing, border policing and the changing dynamics of unauthorized mobility.

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterize this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Illegal People

How Globalization Creates Migration and Criminalizes Immigrants

Illegal People

Argues that the labor and trade policies of the United States have created conditions that easily displace communities and cause migration to occur.

Racialization, Crime, and Criminal Justice in Canada

Racialization, Crime, and Criminal Justice in Canada

Race still matters in Canada, and in the context of crime and criminal justice, it matters a lot. In this book, the authors focus on the ways in which racial minority groups are criminalized, as well as the ways in which the Canadian criminal justice system is racialized. Employing an intersectional analysis, Chan and Chunn explore how the connection between race and crime is further affected by class, gender, and other social relations.The text covers not only conventional topics such as policing, sentencing, and the media, but also neglected areas such as the criminalization of immigration, poverty, and mental illness.