The Letters of Fanny Hensel to Felix Mendelssohn

The Letters of Fanny Hensel to Felix Mendelssohn

Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (1805-47), pianist and composer, maintained a prolific and witty correspondence with her younger brother Felix over the course of approximately 25 years, which is here presented in English translation, with the original German for reference. As the leader of a vibrant salon, Hensel deploys her critical prowess to describe Berlin musical life, including its conservative institutions and personalities, as well as to evaluate Felix's works-in-progress in detail. We also learn about Hensel's own compositions, her attitudes toward herself as a composer, and the significance of Felix's views on the formation of those attitudes. Hensel's letters provide a fascinating glimpse into the problems and challenges facing gifted women musicians in the nineteenth century. The 150 letters are drawn from the Green Books collection of letters addressed to Felix Mendelssohn, in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. Reviews-These letters reveal Fanny Mendelssohn to be a thoroughly fascinating individual, one whose special relationship to Felix would be enough to guarantee the interest of the documents. But we soon become engrossed with Fanny herself, as composer, as critic, as musical commentator and figure in the musical life of Berlin. To watch this world through her eyes is to watch it come alive through the wisdom, wit, and grace of a remarkable person. Citron has a gift for rendering the substance and spirit of these letters into charming and effective English prose that preserves something of the formality of nineteenth-century discourse together with the passion and spirit of Fanny Mendelssohn. Philip Gossett ...reading this volume is a pleasure, not just a musicological duty. Clifford Bartlettthe volume contains penetrating and highly scholarly critical commentaries and is a valuable addition to mendelssohniana. J.R. Belanger, Choice, April 1988

Letters of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy from Italy and Switzerland

Letters of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy from Italy and Switzerland

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy was born at Hamburg, on the third of February, 1809. The name to which he was destined to add such lustre, was already high in the annals of fame. Moses Mendelssohn, his grandfather, a great Jewish philosopher, one of the most remarkable men of his time, was the author of profound Metaphysical works, written both in German and Hebrew. To this great power of intellect, Moses Mendelssohn added a purity and dignity of character worthy of the old stoics. The epigraph on the bust of this ancestor of the composer, shows the esteem in which he was held by his contemporaries: "Faithful to the religion of his fathers, as wise as Socrates, like Socrates teaching the immortality of the soul, and like Socrates leaving a name that is immortal." One of Moses Mendelssohn's daughters married Frederick Schlegel, and swerving from the religion in which both had been brought up, both became Roman Catholics. Joseph Mendelssohn, the eldest son of this great old man, was also distinguished for his literary taste, and has left two excellent works of very different characters, one on Dante, the other on the system of a paper currency. In conjunction with his brother, Abraham, he founded the banking-house of Mendelssohn Ñ Company at Berlin, still flourishing under the management of the sons of the original founders, the brothers and cousins of Felix, the subject of this memoir. George Mendelssohn the son of Joseph, was also a distinguished political writer and Professor in the University at Bonn. With such an array of intellectual ancestry, the Mendelssohn of our day came into the world at Hamburg, on the third of February,1809. He was named Felix, and a more appropriate name could not have been found for him, for in character, circumstance and endowment, he was supremely happy. Goethe, speaking of him, said "the boy was born on a lucky day." His first piece of good fortune, was in having not only an excellent virtuous woman for his mother, but a woman who, besides these qualities, possessed extraordinary intellect and had received an education that fitted her to be the mother of children endowed as hers were. She professed the Lutheran creed, in which her children were brought up. Being of a distinguished commercial family and an heiress, her husband added her name of Bartholdy to his own. Mme. Mendelssohn Bartholdy's other children were, Fanny her first-born, whose life is entirely interwoven with that of her brother Felix, and Paul and Rebecca, born some years later.

Letters of Felix Mendelssohn to Ignaz and Charlotte Moscheles

Letters of Felix Mendelssohn to Ignaz and Charlotte Moscheles

"Letters of Felix Mendelssohn to Ignaz and Charlotte Moscheles" by Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (translated by Felix Moscheles). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy

Swiss sketchbook 1842 : facsimile

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy

In 1842, Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy travelled in Switzerland. During his visit, he drew landscapes as well as small villages and created some delightful pictures of Lausanne, Chamonix and Bern. German and English text.

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor by Felix Mendelssohn for Solo Piano (1841) Op.106

Prelude and Fugue in E Minor by Felix Mendelssohn for Solo Piano (1841) Op.106

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847) was a German pianist, organist, composer, and conductor during the Romantic period. He enjoyed wide acclaim in Germany and much of Europe, but was especially successful in Britain as a soloist and conductor. Mendelssohn composed many symphonies, oratorios, and concerti, his best-known work being his “Overture” and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the “Italian Symphony”, the “Scottish Symphony”, and the overture “The Hebrides”. Classic Music Collection constitutes an extensive library of the most well-known and universally-enjoyed works of classical music ever composed, reproduced from authoritative editions for the enjoyment of musicians and music students the world over.

Mendelssohn masterpieces for solo piano

25 works

Mendelssohn masterpieces for solo piano

This handy new compilation contains a rich selection of Mendelssohn's best work for solo piano, including the well-loved "Rondo capriccioso," Op. 14 (composed before Mendelssohn was 20); "Venetian Gondola Song"; Scherzo in E Minor; Prelude and Fugue in E Minor; "Spinning Song"; "Spring Song"; and many other favorites.

Nachspiel in D Major MWV W 12 - For Solo Organ

Nachspiel in D Major MWV W 12 - For Solo Organ

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847) was a German pianist, organist, composer, and conductor during the Romantic period. He enjoyed wide acclaim in Germany and much of Europe, but was especially successful in Britain as a soloist and conductor. Mendelssohn composed many symphonies, oratorios, and concerti, his best-known work being his “Overture” and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the “Italian Symphony”, the “Scottish Symphony”, and the overture “The Hebrides”. Classic Music Collection constitutes an extensive library of the most well-known and universally-enjoyed works of classical music ever composed, reproduced from authoritative editions for the enjoyment of musicians and music students the world over.

Phantasie by Felix Mendelssohn for Solo Piano (1833) Op.28

Phantasie by Felix Mendelssohn for Solo Piano (1833) Op.28

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Mendelssohn -- 24 Songs

Mendelssohn -- 24 Songs

24 Songs by Felix Mendelssohn and Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel contains youthful gems by two great Romantic composers, originally published only under Felix Mendelssohn's name. Includes word-by-word translations of the Italian, French and German text as well as a translation into the International Phonetic Alphabet.