East of Eden

East of Eden

A masterpiece of Biblical scope, and the magnum opus of one of America’s most enduring authors, in a commemorative hardcover edition In his journal, Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck called East of Eden "the first book," and indeed it has the primordial power and simplicity of myth. Set in the rich farmland of California's Salinas Valley, this sprawling and often brutal novel follows the intertwined destinies of two families—the Trasks and the Hamiltons—whose generations helplessly reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel. The masterpiece of Steinbeck’s later years, East of Eden is a work in which Steinbeck created his most mesmerizing characters and explored his most enduring themes: the mystery of identity, the inexplicability of love, and the murderous consequences of love's absence. Adapted for the 1955 film directed by Elia Kazan introducing James Dean, and read by thousands as the book that brought Oprah’s Book Club back, East of Eden has remained vitally present in American culture for over half a century.

Back to Eden

A Human Interest Story of Health and Restoration to be Found in Herb, Root, and Bark

Back to Eden

Fully updated to reflect the nutritional needs of the '80s, this new edition of the classic guide to herbal medicine, natural foods and home remedies underscores the fundamental principle that true healing consists of a return to natural habits of living.

Exiles from Eden

Religion and the Academic Vocation in America

Exiles from Eden

This essay argues that Max Weber and his contemporaries led higher education astray by stressing research - the making and transmitting of knowledge - at the expense of teaching moral character. The author calls instead for an education spiritually grounded in and for thoughtfulness.

Flight from Eden

The Origins of Modern Literary Criticism and Theory

Flight from Eden

"German--and particularly French--sources of the revolution that has occurred in literary theory during the past thirty years have long been recognized. The Russian contribution to these events has been hinted at previously, but Cassedy documents in detail the extraordinary work of Potebnya, Veselovskij, and other figures virtually unknown in the West. . . . An important contribution to intellectual history and literary theory."--Michael Holquist, author of Dostoevsky and the Novel "An astonishing number of complex movements and ideas--from Humboldt through Russian and French Symbolists to Heidegger, Husserl, Roman Jakobson and the deconstructors, from symbology to logology and iconology--begin to fit together in this wide-ranging and provocative book. . . . Cassedy's book will outrage some readers, delight others, and enlighten all."--Caryl Emerson, author of Boris Godunov: Transpositions of a Russian Theme

From Eden to Eden

From Eden to Eden

This book is a most interesting study of the more important historic and prophetic portions of the Scriptures. The author traces the world in its career from the time when God saw everything that he had made and behold it was very good, on through the period while the earth also is defiled under the inhabitants thereof, to the future glorious time when Christ says to His followers, Come ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.

The Eden Express

A Memoir of Insanity

The Eden Express

New Foreword by Kurt Vonnegut Winner of the American Library Association Notable Book Award, in this extraordinary memoir the gifted son of one of the literary grandmasters of the 20th century tells of his nervous breakdown in all its slow-motion intimacy, the taste of mortality and opportunity for humour it provided, and the grim despair it afforded as well. One of the best books about going crazy... Required reading' - New York Times 'Not only a memoir about his loss of...innocence, but a surprisingly good-natured trip' - LA Times'

Eden

Eden

From the author of Solaris, this novel of an encounter with an alien intelligence creates “a terrifyingly plausible picture of a world gone mad” (Kirkus Reviews). Six explorers—the Captain, Doctor, Engineer, Chemist, Physicist, and Cyberneticist—crash land on a beautiful but strange planet, fourth from another sun. The landscape is bizarre, hosting acrid deserts, hissing trees, and thick spiderlike vegetation. But it is the signs of humanity that are most puzzling. In a labyrinth of plant-shaped buildings are dead ends, passageways, domes, vaulted ceilings, and giant statues. And everywhere there are images of death: mass graves, bodies in ditches and wells, clusters of egglike structures filled with skeletons. Something is wrong with the inhabitants of Eden. But as the crew unlocks the secrets of this twisted society, the most haunting fact they must face is how similar it is to their own. The Chicago Tribune lauded Stanislaw Lem as “not only a marvelous spinner of tales of the fantastic but also a challenging philosopher of the meanings and ramifications of technology.” Eden stands as a timeless and powerful examination of the conflict between human nature, human discovery, and all-too-human flaws.

Martin Eden and the Education of Henry Adams

The Advent of Existentialism in American Literature

Martin Eden and the Education of Henry Adams

This volume argues that Jack London's Martin Eden and Henry Adams' The Education of Henry Adams are two of the first works in American literature to embody the motif of existentialism. The development of the existential dilemma in each work will be supported through references to earlier European existentialist writers, with Nietzsche as a focal point. The 19th century fin de siècle was a time of tremendous change, both materially and philosophically. The dawn of the last century was a time of great wealth and imperialistic expansion for Western civilization, but also a time in which the seeds were sown for later military conflict; the enormity of which the world had never witnessed before. From the vantage point of the post-World War years, the materialism of the fin de siècle was a decorative façade that concealed from view the underlying reality of the human abyss. The outbreak of the First World War changed all of that, and the two works examined here anticipated that change. Henry James described the underlying reality of the fin de siècle when he remarked: "To have to take it all now for what the treacherous years were all the while making for and meaning is too tragic for any words." Henry Adams and Jack London mirror this sentiment in their respective works by depicting the philosophical turbulence of the 19th century fin de siècle.

Traces of Eden

The Last of the American Wilderness

Traces of Eden

Experience the grandeur and splendor of the American wilderness as captured during the author's three-year journey across across the 50 states.

Mecca and Eden

Ritual, Relics, and Territory in Islam

Mecca and Eden

Nineteenth-century philologist and Biblical critic William Robertson Smith famously concluded that the sacred status of holy places derives not from their intrinsic nature but from their social character. Building upon this insight, Mecca and Eden uses Islamic exegetical and legal texts to analyze the rituals and objects associated with the sanctuary at Mecca. Integrating Islamic examples into the comparative study of religion, Brannon Wheeler shows how the treatment of rituals, relics, and territory is related to the more general mythological depiction of the origins of Islamic civilization. Along the way, Wheeler considers the contrast between Mecca and Eden in Muslim rituals, the dispersal and collection of relics of the prophet Muhammad, their relationship to the sanctuary at Mecca, and long tombs associated with the gigantic size of certain prophets mentioned in the Quran. Mecca and Eden succeeds, as few books have done, in making Islamic sources available to the broader study of religion.