Bodies and Souls, or Spirited Bodies?

Bodies and Souls, or Spirited Bodies?

Are humans composed of a body and a nonmaterial mind or soul, or are we purely physical beings? Opinion is sharply divided over this issue. In this clear and concise book, Nancey Murphy argues for a physicalist account, but one that does not diminish traditional views of humans as rational, moral, and capable of relating to God. This position is motivated not only by developments in science and philosophy, but also by biblical studies and Christian theology. The reader is invited to appreciate the ways in which organisms are more than the sum of their parts. That higher human capacities such as morality, free will, and religious awareness emerge from our neurobiological complexity and develop through our relation to others, to our cultural inheritance, and, most importantly, to God. Murphy addresses the questions of human uniqueness, religious experience, and personal identity before and after bodily resurrection.

Mind, Brain and the Elusive Soul

Human Systems of Cognitive Science and Religion

Mind, Brain and the Elusive Soul

Does science argue against the existence of the human soul? Many scientists and scholars believe the whole is more than the sum of the parts. This book uses information and systems theory to describe the more that does not reduce to the parts. One sees this in the synapses - or apparently empty gaps between the neurons in one's brain-where informative relationships give rise to human mind, culture, and spirituality. Drawing upon the disciplines of cognitive science, computer science, neuroscience, general systems theory, pragmatic philosophy, and Christian theology, Mark Graves reinterprets the traditional doctrine of the soul as form of the body to frame contemporary scientific study of the human soul.

Cross Narratives

Martin Luther's Christology and the Location of Redemption

Cross Narratives

Luther's radical interpretation of the two natures of Christ, and specifically its expression through the ubiquitous presence of the humanity of Christ, is a fundamental, integral expression of that same theology. This expression of Luther's theology of the cross, Anthony asserts, provides both a fuller elaboration and an important and creative corrective with reference to recent signal expressions of the theology of the cross. As contemporary theologians of the cross have articulated (most notably Douglas John Hall and the late Alan E. Lewis), the theology of the cross, through a transformation of the divine attributes that honors the integrity of created beings, is preeminently a theology of redemption from within (within-redemption). In the process of outlining and analyzing these theologies of within-redemption, Anthony exposes an impasse created by these theologies regarding the relationship of within-redemption to individual human narratives. It is through Luther's radical interpretation of the two natures of Christ, Anthony contends, that complete within-redemption can be expressed. Anthony also evaluates the Christology of Karl Barth from the perspective of his findings. Not only is Anthony's work an innovative and fresh application of Luther's Christology for contemporary discussions of the theology of the cross, but it places Luther's Christology at the cutting edge of contemporary discussions regarding the theology of the cross and its within-redemption.

The Resounding Soul

Reflections on the Metaphysics and Vivacity of the Human Person

The Resounding Soul

It is surely not coincidental that the term "soul" should mean not only the center of a creature's life and consciousness, but also a thing or action characterized by intense vivacity ("that bike's got soul!"). It also seems far from coincidental that the same contemporary academic discussions that have largely cast aside the language of "soul" in their quest to define the character of human mental life should themselves be so--how to say it?--bloodless, so lacking in soul. This volume arises from the opposite premise, namely that the task of understanding human nature is bound up with and in important respects dependent upon the more critical task of learning to be fully human, of learning to have soul. The papers collected here are derived from a conference in Oxford sponsored by the Centre of Theology and Philosophy and together explore the often surprising landscape that emerges when human consciousness is approached from this angle. Drawing upon literary, philosophical, theological, historical, and musical modes of analysis, the essays of this volume vividly remind the reader of the power of the ancient language of soul over against contemporary impulses to reduce, fragment, and overly determine human selfhood.

The Resounding Soul

Reflections on the Metaphysics and Vivacity of the Human Person

The Resounding Soul

It is surely not coincidental that the term 'soul' should mean not only the centre of a creature's life and consciousness, but also a thing or action characterised by intense vivacity ('that bike's got soul!'). It also seems far from coincidental that the same contemporary academic discussions that have largely cast aside the language of 'soul' in their quest to define the character of human mental life should themselves be so bloodless, or so lacking in soul. The Resounding Soul arises from the opposite premise: that the task of understanding human nature is bound up with the more critical task of learning to be fully human. The papers collected here are derived from a conference in Oxford sponsored by the Centre of Theology and Philosophy and explore the often surprising landscape that emerges when human consciousness is approached from this angle. Drawing upon literary, philosophical, theological, historical, and musical modes of analysis, these essays remind the reader of the power of the ancient language of soul over against contemporary impulses to reduce, fragment, and overly determine human selfhood.

God, Mind and Knowledge

God, Mind and Knowledge

The themes of God, Mind and Knowledge are central to the philosophy of religion but they are now being taken up by professional philosophers who have not previously contributed to the field. This book is a collection of original essays by eminent and rising philosophers and it explores the boundaries between philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, metaphysics, and epistemology.

Death, Resurrection, and Transporter Beams

An Introduction to Five Christian Views on Life after Death

Death, Resurrection, and Transporter Beams

What has Star Trek to do with eternal life? It provides the perfect metaphor for understanding the main Christian views concerning what happens to us when we die. In this book, Silas Langley uses the Star Trek transporter beam to explain five main Christian views about life after death. Each of us lives with some personal answer to the universal question of what comes after death. Even among Christians, views differ as to what exactly happens when we die. Meanwhile, the modern secular world increasingly challenges the possibility of life after death. How can we live again after we die if much of science and philosophy suggests that all that we are dies with our bodies? This book shows how each of these views responds to these challenges. Death, Resurrection, and Transporter Beams sorts out these disagreements and their biblical grounding. These differences matter, since they bear on who we are and how we are to live our lives. Readers will come away with a clearer understanding of their own beliefs on this topic, and with tools to enter into dialogue with people whose beliefs differ.

Transforming the Struggles of Tamars

Single Women and Baptistic Communities

Transforming the Struggles of Tamars

This book explores the unprecedented challenge of involuntary singleness for women, and the implications of disregarding this challenge for the Christian (and particularly, baptistic) communities of faith. It argues that these communities not only fail involuntarily single women, but also in so doing, suffer a serious detriment to their own communal health and Christian witness. Taking the challenge of involuntary singleness as a test case, this book explores the method of convictional theology and argues for a holistic framework that can draw together the personal, communal, and visionary spheres of human existence. Although primarily a work of theological ethics, it also draws from a number of different disciplines, including cultural studies and sociology as well as intersections of science and theology.

Jesus Christ, Eternal God

Heavenly Flesh and the Metaphysics of Matter

Jesus Christ, Eternal God

Drawing on modern physics and ancient metaphysics, Stephen H. Webb constructs a philosophy of Christian materialism based on the unity of matter and spirit in the incarnation.

Science and Religion

A New Introduction

Science and Religion

Now thoroughly updated to reflect the latest debates, this popular textbook introduces readers to the central questions in the field of science and religion. Ideally suited to those who have little or no prior knowledge in either area, it incorporates numerous student-friendly features, including maps, summaries, and historical references, resulting in the most up-to-date introduction to the study of religion and the natural sciences available. Examines the historical, theological, philosophical and scientific aspects of the interaction between religion and science Fully updated to reflect current, cutting-edge debates on scientific atheism and the limits of scientific method, and discussions about the relationship between science and religion in major world faiths Includes a historical component to enable readers to orientate themselves within the subject Takes a topic based approach which fits into the existing structure of most courses, and includes explanatory material not found in other works of this kind, making it highly accessible for those with little scientific or religious background knowledge Incorporates illustrations, tables, maps, summaries and questions for a lively and engaging approach to the subject Written by world-renowned theologian, Alister McGrath; author of bestselling books such as Dawkins’ God, and an acknowledged expert in the field of science and religion