The Common Law Tradition

Deciding Appeals

The Common Law Tradition


American Law in the Common Law Tradition

Foundations of the Law of the United States

American Law in the Common Law Tradition

Foundations of the Law of the United States is designed to introduce individuals to the basic structure of the American legal/political system, with contrasts to the civil law system: 1) The adversarial approach; 2) Sources and Interpretation of American law (with emphasis on customary law and the role of judicial precedent); 3) Fact finding (in particular the jury); 4) Structure of American government, and 5) Relationship between governments and individuals. The materials emphasize the primary source of American law - published decisions from American courts. About the author: Mack A. Player is Professor of Law at Santa Clara University, where he teaches Introduction to United States Law and Employment Discrimination Law. Professor Player served as Dean of the Law School at Santa Clara University from 1994-2003 after which he served as the Director of Santa Clara Center for Global Law and Policy. Professor Player has held chaired professorships at the University of Georgia and at Florida State University. He has taught courses in United States Law at the Universities of Vienna, St. Gallen (Switzerland), and Gent (Belgium). He has published casebooks, a text, and nutshells- on Employment Discrimination."

Great Legal Traditions

Civil Law, Common Law, and Chinese Law in Historical and Operational Perspective

Great Legal Traditions

Great Legal Traditions: Civil Law, Common Law, and Chinese Law in Historical and Operational Perspective draws on the nearly thirty years of experience that the author has accumulated from working in and writing about a variety of legal systems around the world. After an introduction to the underlying concepts and values of comparative legal studies, Head embarks on a brisk six-chapter survey of European civil law, English and American common law, and Chinese law (both dynastic and contemporary). Each legal tradition is divided into two perspectives — first historical and then operational. Numerous illustrations and biographical sketches bring the historical surveys to life, thereby setting the stage for a close examination of several key attributes of representative legal systems in each of the three traditions. Head's "operational" topics include sources of law, the role and training of lawyers, the division of court jurisdiction, constitutional review, the role of codification, and more — and he gives special attention to comparative criminal procedure. Great Legal Traditions is designed primarily for use in law schools and other graduate programs in comparative history, international relations, and both European and Chinese area studies, but the book is also written to be accessible to a more general readership. The main text is supplemented with numerous appendices that serve in place of a documents supplement. A teacher's manual is also available with guidance on each of the study questions that Head places at the beginning of each chapter (roughly 200 study questions in all). The teacher's manual also provides guidance (and confidence) to instructors not already familiar with Chinese law and history.

Law in the United States

Law in the United States

Law in the United States, Second Edition, is a concise presentation of the salient elements of the American legal system designed mainly for jurists of civil law backgrounds. It focuses on features of American law likely to be least familiar to jurists from other legal traditions, such as American common law, the federal structure of the U.S. legal system, and the American constitutional tradition. The use of comparative law technique permits foreign jurists to appreciate the American legal system in comparison with legal systems with which they are already familiar. Chapters in the second edition also cover such topics as American civil justice, criminal law, jury trial, choice of laws and international jurisdiction, the American legal profession, and the influence of American law in the global legal order.

Major Legal Systems in the World Today

An Introduction to the Comparative Study of Law

Major Legal Systems in the World Today

A significant introduction to the study of comparative law and a notable scholarly work, "Major Legal Systems in the World Today" analyzes the general characteristics which lie behind the development of the four principal legal systems of the world: the Civil law, the Common law, the Socialist law (primarily Soviet), and those based on religious or philosophical principles (Muslim, Hindu, Chinese, Japanese, and African). Providing unique insights into the spirt of each "legal family, " the book presents a total view of the historical foundation and the sources and structure of the law in each system.

The Common Law Tradition

Lawyers, Books, and the Law

The Common Law Tradition

Legal history is not merely a history of particular events but also a history of traditions, intellectual and institutional. The Common Law Tradition is about the learned traditions which have shaped the common law and the English legal mind over the centuries: the profession, its structure, its technical language and its literature. J.H. Baker also looks at central institutions, such as the inns of court and chancery, and at local courts, which operated on the fringes of the common law, early conveyancing courses, the origins of law reporting and the first identifiable English year-book reporter. There is an account of the short-lived practice of reporting criminal cases at Newgate in the early fourteenth century and a suggestion that the spread of law reporting on the continent of Europe was begun by Englishmen serving in the fourteenth-century curia at Avignon. Legal history is not merely a history of particular events but also a history of traditions, intellectual and institutional. The Common Law Tradition is about the learned traditions which have shaped the common law and the English legal mind over the centuries: the profession, its structure, its technical language and its literature. J.H. Baker also looks at central institutions, such as the inns of court and chancery, and at local courts, which operated on the fringes of the common law, early conveyancing courses, the origins of law reporting and the first identifiable English year-book reporter. There is an account of the short-lived practice of reporting criminal cases at Newgate in the early fourteenth century and a suggestion that the spread of law reporting on the continent of Europe was begun by Englishmen serving in the fourteenth-century curia at Avignon.

History of the Common Law

The Development of Anglo-American Legal Institutions

History of the Common Law

This introductory text explores the historical origins of the main legal institutions that came to characterize the Anglo-American legal tradition, and to distinguish it from European legal systems. The book contains both text and extracts from historical sources and literature. The book is published in color, and contains over 250 illustrations, many in color, including medieval illuminated manuscripts, paintings, books and manuscripts, caricatures, and photographs. Two great themes dominate the book: (1) the origins, development, and pervasive influence of the jury system and judge/jury relations across eight centuries of Anglo-American civil and criminal justice; and (2) the law/equity division, from the emergence of the Court of Chancery in the fourteenth century down through equity's conquest of common law in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The chapters on criminal justice explore the history of pretrial investigation, policing, trial, and sentencing, as well as the movement in modern times to nonjury resolution through plea bargaining. Considerable attention is devoted to distinctively American developments, such as the elective bench, and the influence of race relations on the law of criminal procedure. Other major subjects of this book include the development of the legal profession, from the serjeants, barristers, and attorneys of medieval times down to the transnational megafirms of twenty-first century practice; the literature of the law, especially law reports and treatises, from the Year Books and Bracton down to the American state reports and today's electronic services; and legal education, from the founding of the Inns of Court to the emergence and growth of university law schools in the United States. History of the Common Law offers: dynamic teaching materials that include primary sources, scholarship, summaries, notes, and questions judiciously selected and edited sources over 250 illustrations--many in full color "Living Law "units that connect legal-historical developments to modern law an illustrated timeline that highlights key dates a comprehensive Teacher's Manual, with suggestions for using the book in a two- or three-credit course Vivid writing, engaging source materials, and lavish illustrations breathe life into nearly 1,000 years of Anglo-American legal history. Concise summaries, manageable extracts, clear organization, and a detailed Teacher's Manual consistently support your teaching. *Teacher's Manuals are a professional courtesy offered to professors only. For more information or to request a copy, please contact Aspen Publishers at 800-950-5259 or [email protected]

Comparative Studies in Continental and Anglo-American Legal History

Anglo-American Law and Canon Law: Canonical Roots of the Common Law Tradition

Comparative Studies in Continental and Anglo-American Legal History

Hauptbeschreibung In the book at issue, the author endeavors to demonstrate a fact that has often been neglected by many Anglo-American legal historians: the Anglo-American legal tradition has more elements in common with Continental law than is frequently believed (Continent = European; continental law and doctrine: see also ""ius commune, ius utrumque""). The ""insularity"" of English law has never been complete. The learned laws, and particularly the canon law, have also played a very significant role in the historical evolution of English law. The formative process of the common.

Common Law and Civil Law Today - Convergence and Divergence

Common Law and Civil Law Today - Convergence and Divergence

Authors from 13 countries come together in this edited volume, Common Law and Civil Law Today: Convergence and Divergence, to present different aspects of the relationship and intersections between common and civil law. Approaching the relationship between common and civil law from different perspectives and from different fields of law, this book offers an intriguing insight into the similarities, differences and connections between these two major legal traditions. This volume is divided into 3 parts and consists of 22 articles. The first part discusses the common law/civil law dichotomy in the international legal systems and theory. The second focuses on case-law and arbitration, while the third part analyses elements of common and civil law in various legal systems. By offering such a variety of approaches and voices, this book allows the reader to gain an invaluable insight into the historical, comparative and theoretical contexts of this legal dichotomy. From its carefully selected authors to its comprehensive collection of articles, this edited volume is an essential resource for students, researchers and practitioners working or studying within both legal systems.

Legality and Community

On the Intellectual Legacy of Philip Selznick

Legality and Community

Bridging sociology, legal and social theory and moral philosophy, this volume explores the significance of Philip Selznick's work in a variety of social contexts, particularly the search for responsive law and governance, humane institutions and a balance between freedom and communal life.